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The ACS International Award for Research in Agrochemicals is given to a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the field of agrochemicals at the international level. Their vision and sustained contributions will have opened new horizons for other investigators in their field and beyond. Nominations are now being sought for the 2022 Award winner to be presented at the ACS Fall 2023 National Meeting in San Francisco, California.  This award includes an honorarium of $5000 USD. Deadline for nominations is December 31, 2021. For details on the nomination process, see the the Call for Nominations.

For more information, please contact Qing Li, AGRO Awards Committee Chair, 808-956-2011.

2021 Award Recipient

David B. Sattelle received his PhD in Zoology from the University of Cambridge in 1971 working on invertebrate neurobiology and joined the Cambridge – based AFRC Unit of Invertebrate Chemistry and Physiology. The award of a Sir Henry Wellcome Travel Fellowship enabled him to work at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, USA.

On returning to Cambridge he led a group working on invertebrate neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, molecules which include important targets for anthelmintic drugs and insecticides. He was awarded the 1983 Pfizer Academic Award for his research in this field. He was elected a Fellow of Queens’ College, Cambridge, where he directed studies in Natural Sciences (Biology). David’s work on the receptors and channels of identified insect neurons and the cloning and functional expression of insect and nematode neurotransmitter receptors has contributed to our understanding of the molecular targets of many crop protection chemicals and animal health drugs. These include pyrethroids, neonicotinoids, levamisole and many others.

In 1999, David moved to Oxford to join the MRC Functional Genomics Unit  as Head of Neural Signalling and was appointed Professor of Molecular Neurobiology in 2000. In Oxford he explored the utility of invertebrate genetic model organisms (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) in understanding human nervous system and neuromuscular diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy and congenital myasthenia. Such models offer low-cost, high-throughput chemical and genetic screens in the search for new chemical leads and new drug targets. He was appointed a Fellow of Wolfson College. In Oxford, David also worked on the first reported genome of a pest insect species (flour beetle) and the first completed genome of a beneficial insect species (honeybee) as well as the first genome of an insect used in biological control (a parasitoid wasp).

He then served as Head of Neural Systems and Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at The University of Manchester and is currently Research Associate Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at University College London. Recently he has worked on the genomes of the Lyme disease tick and the mosquito vector of dengue, yellow fever, and zika. He has also developed an invertebrate automated phenotyping platform (INVAPP) which facilitates both chemical and genetic screening. This technology has been applied in the search for new drugs for human nervous system and neuromuscular disorders and new chemical leads to combat neglected tropical diseases in situations where mosquito vector control is threatened by resistance to current insecticides and where there is an urgent need for an effective anthelmintic to control human whipworm. His 363 papers have nearly 20,000 citations, and he has and h-index of 77. He is Co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of CeBioscience Ltd. David is a Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society, The Royal Society of Biology and a Member of The Academy of Europe.

Past Awardees

2020

Qing X. Li, University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa, Hawai‘i

2019

Vincent L. Salgado, BASF, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

2018

Stephen Powles, University of Western Australia, Australia

2017

Jeffrey Bloomquist, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

2016

Yoshihisa Ozoe, Shimane University, Japan

2015

Keith D. Wing, formerly of Rohm and Haas and DuPont Crop Protection, Wilmington, DE

2014

Ralf Nauen, Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany

2013

René Feyereisen, National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA), France

2012

Thomas C. Sparks, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN

2011

George P. Lahm, DuPont Crop Science, Newark, Delaware

2010

Shinzo Kagabu, Gifu University, Gifu, Japan

2009

R. Donald Wauchope, USDA-ARS (retired), Tifton, Georgia

2008

David M. Soderlund, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

2007

Gerald T. Brooks, University of Sussex (retired), Brighton, UK

2007

Fredrick J. Perlak, Monsanto, St. Louis, Missouri

2006

Joel Coats, Iowa State University, Ames

2006

Isamu Yamaguchi, Agricultural Chemicals Inspection Station, Tokyo, Japan

2005

Robert Krieger, University of California-Riverside

2005

Janice E. Chambers, Mississippi State University, Starkville

2004

Stephen Duke, USDA-ARS, Oxford, Mississippi

2004

John Marshall Clark, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

2003

Hideo Ohkawa, Kobe University, Japan

2003

Bob Hollingworth, Michigan State University, East Lansing

2002

Marinus Los, American Cyanamid, Princeton, New Jersey

2002

Keith Solomon, University of Guelph, Canada

2001

Ralph Mumma, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

2001

Donald Crosby, University of California-Davis

2000

Herbert B. Scher, Zeneca, Richmond, California

2000

George P. Georghiou, University of California-Riverside

1999

James Seiber, University of Nevada-Reno

1999

Don Baker, Zeneca, Richmond, California

1998

Leslie Crombie, University of Nottingham, England

1998

George Levitt, DuPont, Wilmington, Delaware

1997

Izuru Yamamoto, University of Tokyo, Japan

1997

Fritz Führ, Institute of Chemistry and Dynamic, Jülich, Germany

1996

Klaus Naumann, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany

1996

Günther Voss, Ciba, Basel, Switzerland

1995

Mohyee Eldefrawi, University of Maryland-Baltimore

1995

Koji Nakanishi, Columbia University, New York, New York

1994

Toshio Fujita, Kyoto University, Japan

1993

Morifusa Eto, Kyushu University, Fukoka, Japan

1992

Bruce Hammock, University of California-Davis

1991

Stuart Frear, USDA-ARS, Fargo, North Dakota

1990

David Schooley, University of Nevada-Reno

1989

Toshio Narahashi, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois

1988

Ernest Hodgson, North Carolina State University

1987

Fumio Matsumura, Michigan State University, East Lansing

1986

James Tumlinson, USDA-ARS, Gainesville, Florida

1985

Junshi Miyamoto, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Japan

1984

Jacques Jean Martel, Roussel Uclaf, Paris, France

1983

Karl Heinz Buechel, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany

1982

Jack R. Plimmer, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, Maryland

1981

Philip C. Kearney, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, Maryland

1980

Minoru Nakajima, Kyoto University, Japan

1979

Milton S. Schechter, USDA-ARS (retired), Beltsville, Maryland

1978

Julius J. Menn, Stauffer Chemical Co., Mountain View, California

1977

Francis A. Gunther, University of California-Riverside

1976

Morton Beroza, USDA-ARS (retired), Beltsville, Maryland

1975

Michael Elliot, Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, England

1974

T. Roy Fukuto, University of California-Riverside

1973

Hubert Martin, British Crop Protection Council, London, England

1972

Ralph L. Wain, Wye College, University of London,England

1971

Robert L. Metcalf, University of Illinois, Champagne-Urban

1970

Richard D. O’Brien, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

1969

John E. Casida, University of California-Berkley

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